She Asked Me About Cake

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Since I ventured into the world of becoming an  indie author, I’ve gotten to know other authors from Canada, the U.S., England, Spain, The Netherlands, South Africa and the United Arab Emirates. I realize this might give you the impression that I’m a contemporary nomad, traveling the world to promote my novels at book signings, attending writing conferences and lecturing on panels with other authors. That’s a pretty sweet picture. I like it so much, that I’ll add it to my author vision board (once I get around to making it).

But the truth of it is, I’ve met most of the authors I know online. Such is the case with author Isabella May, whose novel Oh! What a Pavlova will be released in October of 2017.

After discovering that we are both avid readers and that our novels have some similarities (a penchant for travel, including Italy and food), she interviewed me on her website. Her questions weren’t the ordinary ones. She asked me about cake, ESD and more. She’s even visited my little (population 5,000) home town of Solvang in California!

You can read the interview, entitled We talk Venice, ‘European Style Detachment’ and Carrot Cake… by clicking on the link. Like the interview? Please share it on Twitter and Facebook by clicking on those options at the end of her interview. After this experience, I am inclined to start interviewing other authors as well.

 

 

 

 

From Dormouse to Santa Ynez Valley Star

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As a kid, I was terribly shy. So my mom–showing sensitivity and understanding for my inherent shyness–threw me head first into a summer drama program.

I started out on a large stage in the small role of the Dormouse in Alice in Wonderland at the Solvang Theaterfest.  I moved on to play a street urchin in Oliver!  Despite my height as a youth, I even had a role as a dwarf in The Hobbit before eventually getting a lead role as Gerda in The Snow Queen.  In other words, I had the shy beaten out of me, one play at a time. 

I’m now an extroverted introvert who begins conversations with others, can network and even speak in public, though my stomach still gets all tied up in knots every darned time I step on a stage.

The good thing is, I actually like talking to people now. I even like talking to reporters, most of the time.  So I guess, after all of these years, I am thankful to mom, to the drama teacher Maria Bland and her opera singing brother Jo, who taught me to use my voice. I’m also thankful to that motley crew of fellow youth actors who bolstered my confidence in those early years in the Santa Ynez Valley.

You need a voice in life after all, especially if you want to be a known author.

Right now I’m a known author to a small but growing circle of  readers, family and friends. I wouldn’t mind being a star. Or at least mentioned in the Santa Ynez Valley Star. 

Mission accomplished! (SEE BELOW)

Thank you home town paper! Question is, after reading this interview, do you feel like continuing the reading experience by ordering my novel? That would be the true test. 

Reading and talk at Haagse Hout Library, Saturday June 24th, 2017

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Now that my book launch is over, I’m back to being an author behind the computer screen, escaping into fictional worlds I create, or those of others (I’m one of those authors that LOVES TO READ other authors as well).

But I will come out from behind the screen once again on Saturday, June 24th, 2017 as part of the Parels in Bezuidenhout celebration.


The Parelroute features 47 “pearls” or venues where you can see everything from art and music, participate in workshops and meet authors.

I will be giving a presentation at the Haagse Hout Library (Theresiastraat 195, The Hague) at 1:00pm and 3:00pm. I will discuss how living in The Hague influenced the narrative of my latest novel The Things We Said in Venice, do a reading and there is a chance to purchase a copy of one or both of my titles on this day as well. Not able to make it that day? My book is also available at The American Book Center, The Hague (Lange Poten 23) and via Amazon in your respective countries (best shipping rates to The Netherlands is via Amazon.de).


Here’s the map of the event. As you can see, there’s no shortage of participants! You can see the full schedule on this website and plan your own route for the Parel Dag.

Romance Your Way into Continuing with the Paris Climate Accord Without Trump.

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For the record, I try to stay away from politics and religion on my author blog, as I do not wish to alienate those who have views that differ from my own. Yet, in the light of yesterday’s news, I am going to break my own blog rule.Paris-climate-accord-1-e1475689925232

As some of us scratch our heads in dismay at the current U.S. administration’s choice to pull out of the Paris Climate Accord, others view it as a sound business decision that put’s America first.

How do we–those of us that have a more global view of our shared responsibility for the health of the planet, and trust the scientific community’s overwhelming evidence that human contribution to climate change is real–interact with those who believe climate change is a hoax / that an environmentally conscientious lifestyle isn’t necessary?

If it’s a female friend, co-worker or neighbor you are trying to reach, you could romance her into considering a more environmental lifestyle. And I have just the man for the job: Jake Tillerman. If you haven’t met Jake, you are seriously missing out. He’s the male protagonist inHearts-heart-clipart my debut novel GREEN and the environmental and social debates that unfold in this opposites-attract story between Jake Tillerman and Ellie Ashburn are the perfect introduction to leading an environmental lifestyle, without bashing someone over the head with your ideology. (Let sexy Jake it for you!) 

He introduces Ellie and her office mates at the design and fashion magazine Duomo to a Seven Change Challenge, which provides daily steps to reduce your dependence on an oil-based economy and help save the planet. He also challenges Ellie on many levels to consider how her lifestyle affects the world around her.

Don’t worry. Ellie is strong andgreen steffi Thomas has her own opinions, and she isn’t afraid to verbally spar with Jake on every topic. That not-so-green friend of yours might even recognize herself in Ellie.

The love story is also quite compelling and as you get caught up in the plot, that green ideology slowly seeps into the reader’s conscience, as they consider not only love, but the broader sense of loving the planet. Sneaky plan, isn’t it? But it might open the door to a positive conversation; conversations we need to have with one another about the future of our shared home: Earth.

You can order a copy of GREEN on Amazon.com in both kindle and paperback format or through most U.S. bookstores.

Makes a great gift that just might start a conversation. Here is a link,

Other ideas to start the conversation:
1) We can take immediate action in our own lives as described in this 2015 New York Times article What You Can Do aBout Climate Change and just like Jake Tillerman, use those actions as a way to engage others to do the same.

2) We can be inspired by Al Gore’s response to Trumps pull-out from the Paris Climate Accord and learn what comes next on his website. Here’s an excerpt from Gore’s letter that came in my inbox yesterday:

“Civic leaders, mayors, governors, CEOs, investors and the majority of the business community will take up this challenge. We are in the middle of a clean energy revolution that no single person or group can stop. President Trump’s decision is profoundly in conflict with what the majority of Americans want from our president; but no matter what he does, we will ensure that our inevitable transition to a clean energy economy continues.” 

Learn more at Climate Reality Project.

3) You can feel the rage laced with humor of Arnold Schwarzenegger with his video.

4) Reach out, engage and expand your circle of friends, co-workers and neighbors who also want to take action so that together, we can be the grass roots revolution that makes the Paris Climate Accord a reality.

Wow! I really sound like Jake Tillerman right now. I know someone’s going to tell us that the glass is actually half empty, but I think Jake, Al, Arnold and I are all in agreement: it’s definitely half-full.

 

 

Chapter One

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17311457_10154268386862213_983549551_oSo you’ve happened upon my blog. Welcome and I’m glad you found me! In a nutshell, I’m an indie author and I write contemporary romance with an eco-conscience. Today I have decided to share Chapter 1 of The Things We Said in Venice, my second novel that just came out this spring. Consider it a long teaser.

Because I’ve been influenced by Dutch directness, I’ll be direct; if you like what you read, you can order a new copy of The Things We Said in Venice here, now, as in today, in both Kindle or Paperback by clicking this link. Why the directness? Because stories are written to be . . . well. . . read. Of course if you live in Great Britain the Amazon UK site is best and if you live anywhere else in Europe the Amazon Germany site is best (cheaper shipping). You can also read reviews on the Amazon US site, see press on the press link of my blog, or Google it. Here’s that teaser . . .

The Things We Said in Venice
Chapter 1
Sarah

While the locals shuffle carefully over the snow-slicked sidewalks, Sarah runs like a mad woman toward the Belluno station. I will not miss this one, she chants in time to the distant, yet steady clickety-clack of the train’s metal wheels gliding over tracks. She picks up her pace, the icy air burning her nostrils, the straps of her pack chafing her shoulders despite her thick winter layers.

She cuts through the abandoned village park, her laborious movements at odds with the utter stillness as Belluno train station finally pops into view. As she slows her pace, her body relays physical complaints to her mind: the surprising weight of her backpack cutting into her shoulders, the ache of ice-cold air in her lungs, the burning sensation of snowflakes on her cheeks.

When she comes to a standstill, a rush of heat explodes through her body. Moments later, perspiration builds beneath her thick winter layers, cooling her down. Damp curls form a blanket of cold around her neck. She shakes her head involuntarily as the first shiver crawls up her spine.

As means of distraction, Sarah people watches, though the pickings are slim—a thickly built woman holding the hand of a stout, large-eared boy, presumably her son, and an older, clean-shaven man in military uniform. All three sport dry hair.

By the time the train pulls into the station and Sarah hears the familiar hiss of the doors opening, her teeth are chattering. She finds a free place in the third railcar and finally unstraps the cumbersome backpack, setting it in the seat beside her. The whistle sounds and the train is about to take off, but it doesn’t. There is some sort of commotion. The doors open and close again. She can hear two men talking, perhaps the conductor and a male passenger. Although she can’t make out the words, one voice is laced with tension and a bit too loud. The other voice, which she assumes belongs to the conductor, remains calm.

Back home, she would need to know why the doors had to open once more and what these men are discussing. But in the past four weeks of free-wheeling through western Europe on her own, she has adjusted her way of responding to things beyond her control. She has learned to let go. It is so different from how she acts at home that she has given her newfound skill a name: European Style Detachment.

Her feet and hands begin to return to body temperature as the train finally leaves the station. She leans into her large backpack and closes her eyes. She feels a slight pulsing in her subconscious, like an alarm clock going off in the neighboring hotel room; something you hear, but can choose to ignore. Except that she can’t. Something’s not right. It could be that slightly angry conversation she overheard, or it could be that the bag she is leaning into doesn’t smell like her bag. It has the faint scent of cinnamon and musk tinged with sweat; the scent of a man.

Sarah straightens in her seat, scrutinizing the travel backpack as one might scrutinize a naked stranger you have unwittingly brought into your bed—curiosity tempered with fear. It is black like hers. It has the white North Face logo of her bag and the same rainbow strap she put on it to differentiate her black bag from all the other black bags of the world. But isn’t the strap in a different place? And come to think of it, it felt heavier than her bag when she was sprinting to the train station.

Maybe it smells so manly from being in the pile of luggage where she stashed it while she grabbed a brioche at the café. Or, it could have been shuffled around in the compartment beneath the shuttle bus from Cortina to Belluno; cologne from a man’s bag spilling on hers.

I’m being ridiculous, she tells herself. But she unbuckles the exterior straps anyway and peers into the top compartment.

“Oh my God!” Sarah exclaims as she shuffles through the doppelganger of her bag. Several passengers turn toward her momentarily and then look away, exemplifying European Style Detachment. At the top of the backpack is a photography magazine written in what she thinks must be German. She pushes aside the magazine, revealing an impressive stash of Cote d’Or chocolate bars in their distinctive red and gold cardboard wrappers, cloth handkerchiefs in a Ziploc bag, a leather-bound journal, water, men’s plaid underwear size XL, slacks, long sleeve shirts, pants and thick woolen socks. On the inside tag of the top compartment is a name written in black permanent marker: Fokke van der Veld. She stops her search and pushes the bag away in shock. How the hell did this happen?

It has stopped snowing outside and sun reflects off the whitened fields, punching into the window. Sarah reaches automatically into the side pocket for her sunglasses, but of course they’re not there. Her mother is in a thick pea coat, wearing Sarah’s missing sunglasses and deathly blue lipstick that promises to make her forthcoming tirade all the graver:

What are you going to do now Sarah? You should have taken your time in Cortina d’Ampezzo to make sure you had your own bag! Your passport, your money, your iPad. Everything is in that bag! You could be mistaken for a terrorist and thrown in prison for traveling without identification.

The locals say Cortina, not Cortina d’Ampezzo, Sarah counters. As a school counselor, she is well aware it’s abnormal to be seeing visions of her mother in her head, not to mention silently conversing with her. But as usual, mom’s got a point. Sarah thinks about Italian corruption, envisions a musty 17th century prison cell with a mangy rat family in one corner and instruments of torture in the other. She stands suddenly, wanting to take action; wanting her mom to shut up. She has thirty euros in her jacket pocket along with the train ticket and the address of the hotel in Treviso where she will be staying. That’s at least something. But how on earth is she going to get her bag back? And who the hell is Fokke van der Veld?

END CHAPTER ONE

Did you enjoy this teaser? You can continue reading by ordering a copy of The Things We Said in Venice in Kindle or Paperback by clicking this link. Please help support this author by purchasing a new copy. Authors get no royalties from second hand books. Royalties help support authors and encourage them to keep writing.

THANK YOU FOR READING.

Yours truly,

Kristin Anderson

 

 

 

What a Book Launch Looks Like

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Weekend before last, it was finally here; my book launch of The Things We Said in Venice at the American Book Center in The Hague.  Thank you friends, book lovers and friendly strangers who filled the room with energy, listened to the Q&A, asked questions, purchased my novel and supported me as an author. In case you missed the launch, here are a few photos.

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Bo Rodenhuis, local teacher and speaker does a Q&A with the author (me!) Photo: Mischa van den Brandhof

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Taking questions from the audience (Photo: Mischa van den Brandhof)

 

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Signing a copy of The Things We Said in Venice for Dr. Ute Limacher

 

 

Based on my face, Ms. Rodenhuis must have just asked a surprising question!

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Kristin Anderson reading from her novel The Things We Said in Venice

Author Kristin Anderson and Q&A leader Bo Rodenhuis relaxing after the event

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From left to right: Author Kristin Anderson, pianist Guy Livingston, author NJ Simmonds (her book signing for her novel The Path Keeper is June 1st at the American Book Center!) and baby masseuse Floor Tuinstra.

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Kristin with Hague dentist Renu Sani

Didn’t get a chance to make it to the book release? That’s okay. There are more events planned, like participation in Parelroute in Bezuidenhout, where I will talk about how living in The Hague influenced the context of my novel. Parelroute is Saturday, June 24th, 2017.

Just want a live link for an instant gratification purchase? Here you go.

Thank you for reading all the way to the end!

 

 

 

Book Launch Today in The Hague!

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It’s Saturday, high noon. The sun is out. What are you planning for your afternoon?

Every weekend in The Hague, there are wonderful activities happening, all competing for your attention and time. Beach or a lazy afternoon at home? Festival or film? Concert or book signing?

I’m here to add your choices. Today is the day that I am celebrating the launch of my second novel, The Things We Said in Venice. Sure, it’s been available online for the last 9 weeks, but this is the first time I am making a party of it somewhere else besides online, so I can celebrate with people in present time, where we can chat with each other, while looking each other in the eye.

What’s The Things We Said in Venice about? Travel, second chances, architecture, self-discovery, overcoming fear, laughter, relationships, love. For more info, see recent press about the book below the schedule.

 

When and where is it?
Saturday, May 20th, 3-5pm
American Book Center, Lange Poten 23 The Hague

What’s the schedule?*
3:00pm-3:30pm Glass of wine, chat and book signing, raffle entry.
3:30pm-4:00pm Q&A with the author and reading
4:00pm-4:30pm Raffle drawing. Book signing, slideshow.
4:30-5:00pm Second reading and a toast to Venice.
*Schedule may be thrown out the window if necessary. After all, we are on Italian time.

Recent Press about the novel

May 18, 2017 The Hague Online Feature Article / Book Review

THE THINGS WE SAID IN VENICE – NEW FICTION BY HAGUE AUTHOR KRISTIN ANDERSON

May  16, 2017 NLtimes.nl Entertainment Feature Article / Q&A

Q&A: AMERICAN AUTHOR’S SECOND NOVEL A DUTCH, EUROPEAN LOVE STORY

March 24, 2017
Travel blog Dreaming in Arabic shares 5 book recommendations, including The Things We Said in Venice